Noch Tage und : : Std bis zum Treffen 2019!
Aktuelle Zeit: Mi Sep 26, 2018 12:03  
Zur Zeit ist ein Treffen geplant
 
Zeige letzte Beiträge: 3h | 6h | 12h | 24h
•Unbeantwortete Themen •Neue Beiträge •Aktive Themen  

Alle Zeiten sind UTC + 1 Stunde [ Sommerzeit ]

 
 


Ein neues Thema erstellen Auf das Thema antworten  [ 14 Beiträge ] 
Autor Nachricht
 Betreff des Beitrags: 2002 - Dave, Uwe, Norbert und ich auf dem Feldberg
BeitragVerfasst: Sa Jul 15, 2006 14:53 
Offline
Gepäckfix
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: Do Jul 13, 2006 21:05
Beiträge: 5777
Wohnort:Nürnberg
Persönliches Album
Moin,
Dave hat damals folgendes zu unserem Treffen geschrieben. Ich finde, es gehört erhalten.
Also los:

G-Men Meeting at Feldberg.
Dateline Germany, 20 July, 2002

Feldberg mountain north of Frankfurt is a veritable Teutonic motorcyclist's paradise. Saturdays when the weather is good, dozens of bikers from all over the area travel to the top of this scenic peak to see and be seen. The summit of Feldberg, in many ways, reminded me of the Crossroads of Time at Deals Gap in North Carolina where bikers of every stripe converge to indulge their passion, with no regard to brand.

A few internet friends that ride the venerable GSX1100G as I do invited me to meet them during their weekly ride on Feldberg. I drove from the American airbase south of Frankfurt north to Bad Homberg (don't ask me why I was thinking of a rotten cheeseburger the whole way) and then east to Oberursel and then up Feldberg. The scenery along the way reminded me in some ways of the Virginia countryside, aged a few hundred years. After I got off the autobahn, huge, old growth forests sprang up beside the road, and I got brief glimpses of the foothills and mountains to the north as I motored along with the alarmingly fast traffic.

I made the climb up Feldberg - 879 meters (approximately 2700 feet) - on well maintained two-lane blacktop. Along the way I saw several pull-offs where the good people of Germany, ranging in age from toddlers to octogenarians were exchanging their street shoes for hiking boots to explore the dozens of trails on and around Feldberg. Bicyclists in neon spandex gear strained at their pedals, ascending to the top.

In one particular parking area along the way, I saw signs of hooliganism with circular burnout marks and tire-made happy faces similar to ones in the United States. Uwe, one of the folks I was going to meet, later told me that the racers met in that spot below the summit to brag, show off and then challenge each other on the twisting road down toward Schmitten. It's good to know things aren't so different across the Atlantic.

I arrived at the top of Feldberg an hour early, fearing that I would get lost at least once on the ride. Driving in Germany is an adventure for anyone used to the highways of the southwest USA. First, traffic Deutchland traffic moves out. You are either with it, or run over. Second, getting anyplace in a land where you don't understand the street signs or the language too well is always an adventure. Finally, there are some roads that you cross that you just can't get to from the autobahn. If you don't know the area, the adage "you can't get there from here" takes on a whole new dimension.

Uwe's directions were flawless, however, and I had plenty of time to take in the doings on top of the mountain before the other G-Men arrived. I walked the footpath around the old hotel cum observation tower at the summit to see the spectacular view of picturesque tiny towns on the plain below the mountain before heading up to the parking area at the top.

Of course, there were more BMWs on top of Feldberg than Harleys, but you would have to expect that in the land of the venerable Bavarian Motor Werks. In all there were between 50 and 100 motorcycles of every imaginable type on display, their riders affecting a cool, disinterested air and posing in cordura or leather riding outfits. Before talking about the bikes, I would like to mention one thing about the German riders: they do know how to dress.

Even scooter riders, and there were at least a dozen there at all times on tiny Hondas and Suzukis and even Vespas, were decked out from head to foot in proper riding gear. The weather in Germany is, at best, unpredictable, and riders there know that what starts out as a 20 degree centigrade day (about 70F) could turn to rain or even snow without any warning. All outerwear appeared at least abrasion and rain resistant, and high visibility strips of retroreflective neon adorned the backs of jackets and helmets everywhere I looked.

The German bikes were every bit as impressive as ones found at biker hangouts in the good ol' USA, except there didn't seem to be even the slightest bit of bike-related prejudice on Feldberg. I found BMW K-series bikes beside classic Moto Guzzis beside S&S Harley-style choppers. For the most part, riders recognized other riders as brethren of the sport. Only the hooligan types on their race replicas set themselves apart, though I suspect it was more for the room to do burnouts and a better start position for racing the mountain than anything else.

Uwe, Norbert and Rolf arrived as I was still looking at all the motorcycles. I could hear the distinctive GSX1100G turbine sound before I spotted them motoring up into the parking area. After brief introductions, we chatted about their motorcycles, and I took a look at some of the more obvious differences between the US and European models. What surprised me most was the handlebar controls. Imagine! Euro riders have the option of turning off their headlights....

Over some coffee, the four of us talked motorcycles, motorcycling, and shared our stories of how we got started, and what kind of riding we like to do. As a group, these German riders seemed very serious about their motorcycles as primary transportation. It is very little surprise to me that is so, as riding in the European Union is much more expensive than in the US.

Taxes, fees and regulatory concerns make riding as a mere hobby in Germany a very expensive prospect. Although motorcycles make a lot of sense in a part of the world where gasoline runs over $4 per gallon, the strict inspections mandatory every two years would give the casual American rider pause. German laws require bike owners to annotate all non-stock equipment on their motorcycles. Aftermarket, non-stock parts have to be approved by the transportation authorities, and are therefore quite expensive. Exhaust volume is measured and regulated, and installing non-approved pipes could get your bike impounded.

After talking to Uwe, Norbert and Rolf for three hours, I found myself torn between gratitude for the freedoms I enjoy as an American rider, and longing for some of the help European riders receive in return for submitting to the restrictions in their part of the world.

For one, highways are much more motorcycle-friendly than they are in the United States. Signs are placed farther back from the road so as not to be as great of a hazard to a sliding rider. Guardrails are designed to keep riders from sliding underneath. Speeds on the autobahn are much higher and less strictly enforced than in the U.S., but drivers are educated to NEVER pass on the right, to give way to faster vehicles, and motorcyclists are treated with respect for the most part in the highway traffic mix.

Even European automobile design helps keep riders safe. Cars are much smaller on the whole than those you see in the States, due in large part to the cost of gasoline, so cyclists are easier to see in the traffic mix. There are very few SUVs to be found on Germany's roads. Cars and trucks have signals on the front and back as in the U.S., but also on the sides to let passing vehicles see driver intentions. Large trucks are required to place low bumpers on the front and back of their vehicles, as well as fence-like guards to keep riders from falling under the dangerous tandem rear wheels.

Are the trade-offs worth it? I don't know. Uwe told me that riders still find themselves ignored in urban areas. Even though motorcycles make up as much as ten percent of registered vehicles in Europe, (riders account for about 3% of registered vehicles in the U.S.) there are still a disproportionate number of accidents involving riders. Injuries and fatalities are, as in America, higher for accident-involved riders than drivers.

Throughout our meeting, I marveled again at the similarities all riders share - regardless where in the world we ride. My German friends completely understood where I came from as a motorcycle safety instructor. I empathized with their concerns about riding the highways of Europe. In the end, we were of a mind.

We chatted for three hours that sunny Saturday afternoon, surrounded by motorcycles on Feldberg mountain. In the end, we were not Germans or Americans. We were all just riders - brothers of the road sharing stories about our shared passion for the thrill of traveling on two-wheels.

Our love of motorcycles that sets us apart from the crowd, drew us together, bridging language and cultural barriers. We shook hands with honest affection, warmly wishing each other all the best. I watched my German friends motor out of the parking lot on bikes just like mine and a part of my went with them, riding the twisting two-lane blacktop down Feldberg mountain and beyond.

dgh

GTreuGruss - Rolf

_________________
Bild

Fürth zählt in Franken nicht, steht sogar bei Wikipedia:
Fürth in Bayern
*flöt*


Nach oben
 Profil E-Mail senden  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags:
BeitragVerfasst: Sa Jul 15, 2006 15:07 
Offline
Gutemine
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: Do Jul 13, 2006 22:07
Beiträge: 1652
Wohnort:Fernwald
Alter: 54
Persönliches Album
Gibt es das auch auf deutsch :gr:

lg

Frauenhilfe
Petra :gr:

_________________
Ich war auch dabei:
Bild BildBild


Nach oben
 Profil E-Mail senden  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags:
BeitragVerfasst: Sa Jul 15, 2006 15:26 
Offline
Gepäckfix
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: Do Jul 13, 2006 21:05
Beiträge: 5777
Wohnort:Nürnberg
Persönliches Album
Petra hat geschrieben:
Gibt es das auch auf deutsch :gr:

lg

Frauenhilfe
Petra :gr:


Ja, natürlich!
Im alten Forum. :cry:
Damals hatte glaub ich Fraro das übersetzt.

Kleiner Tipp:
Red doch mal mit dem Q-Treiber der Dir sehr bekannt ist, der war dabei, UND, er kann es Dir auch transleyten. :wink:

GTreuGruss - Rolf

_________________
Bild

Fürth zählt in Franken nicht, steht sogar bei Wikipedia:
Fürth in Bayern
*flöt*


Nach oben
 Profil E-Mail senden  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags:
BeitragVerfasst: Sa Jul 15, 2006 23:05 
Offline
Forenlämmchen & Frauenversteher
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: Do Jul 13, 2006 21:01
Beiträge: 4926
Wohnort:OHZ (Garlstedt)
Alter: 48
Persönliches Album
Die Übersetzung dieses textes war mein allererster Beitrag im G-Forum. Weil ich noch zu doof zum einloggen war, hstte ich den sogar noch als "Gast" geschrieben.

Aber ich habe so gar keine Lust, den NOCHMAL zu übersetzen...

Interessant wäre es, mal zu hören, ob Closey ähnliche Erfahrungen gemacht hat...

_________________
Ein Frosch ohne Humor ist nur ein kleiner grüner Haufen!
(Kermit, 1976)


Nach oben
 Profil E-Mail senden  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags:
BeitragVerfasst: So Jan 21, 2007 22:36 
Offline
Majestix
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: Do Jul 13, 2006 20:46
Beiträge: 6210
Wohnort:Fernwald
Alter: 58
Persönliches Album
Und weil mir die Übersetzung gerade über den Weg gelaufen ist, kommt sie auch noch dazu:


G-Treiber-Treffen auf dem Feldberg

Deutschland, 20. Juli 2002-11-06

Der Feldberg nördlich von Frankfurt ist ein wahres teutonisches Bikerparadies. Samstags, wenn das Wetter gut ist, fahren dutzende Leute aus der ganzen Gegend zum Gipfel dieses landschaftlich schönen Berges um zu sehen und um gesehen zu werden. Der Gipfel des feldberges erinnert mich in vielem an die Geländestrecken am der Deals Schlucht in North Carolina, wo sich Biker aller Art aus der ganzen Gegend treffen, um Ihrer Leidenschaft zu frönen, egal welche Marke sie fahren.

Einige Freunde aus dem Internet, die ebenfalls die ehrwürdige GSX 1100 G fahren, luden mich ein, sie während ihres Wochenend-Ausritts auf dem Feldberg zu treffen. Ich fuhr vom amerikanischen Luftwaffenstützpunkt im Süden Frankfurts nördlich nach Bad Homburg (frag mich nicht, warum ich dabei die ganze Zeit an einen vergammelten alten Cheeseburger denken musste), dann östlich nach Oberursel und schließlich auf den Feldberg. The Szenerie entlang der Strecke erinnerte mich in einigen Punkten an die Landschaft Virginias, einige hundert Jahre alt. nachdem ich die Autobahn verlassen hatte, führte die Straße bald duch große, sehr alte Wälder aber ich gewann nur einen flüchtigen Eindruck von den Vorgebirgen und Hügeln im Norden, weil ich mich zu sehr auf den höllisch schnellen Verkehr konzentrieren musste.

Ich machte mich an den Aufstieg auf den 879 m (ca. 2.700 Fuß) hohen Feldberg über eine zweispurige, gutausgebaute Asphaltpiste. Die Strecke entlang sah ich einige Leute, alles gute Deutsche vom Schnullerträger bis zum Achtzigjährigen, die Ihre Straßentreter gegen Wanderstiefel tauschten und sich aufmachten, um die Dutzenden von Wanderwegen auf und um den Feldberg zu erkunden. Radfahrer in neonfarbener Pelle strapazierten sich in den Pedalen, während sie sich zum Gipfel aufstiegen.

Auf einem einzelnen Parkplatz an der Strecke sah ich Anzeichen von Rowdies mit burn-out Kreisen und Smileys, mit dem Reifen auf die Piste gebrannt, sehr ähnlich denen in den USA. Uwe, einer der Jungs, die ich treffen wollte, erzählte mir später, dass sich an diesem Platz unterhalb des Scheitelpunktes die Heizer mit ihren Joghurtbechern treffen, um durch Prahlerei das eigene Geltungsbedürfnis zu befriedigen und sich zu halsbrecherischen Rennen die Straße nach Schmitten hinunter herauszufordern. Manchmal ist es gut zu wissen, dass auf der anderen Seite des Atlantiks nicht alles anders ist...

Ich kam eine Stunde zu früh auf dem Feldberg an, weil ich befürchtete, die Strecke nicht gleich zu finden. Das Fahren in Deutschland ist ein Abenteuer für jemanden, der die Highways des amerikanischen Südwestens gewohnt ist. Zuerst zieht es Dir die Schuhe aus! Entweder Du gehst mit- oder Du gehst unter. Außerdem ist es immer ein Abenteuer, sich in einem Land zurechtzufinden, wenn man weder die Schilder lesen noch sich vernünftig in der Landessprache unterhalten kann. Schließlich gibt es noch jede Menge Straßen, die man zwar auf der Autobahn überquert- auf die man aber nicht abbiegen kann. Wenn Du Dich obendrein noch nicht auskennst, bekommt der Spruch "Da kommst Du von HIER aus nicht hin!" eine völlig neue Dimension.

Uwe´s Wegbeschreibung war auf jeden Fall tadellos, und so hatte ich viel Zeit für das, was man auf so einem Berg eben macht, bevor die anderen G-Treiber ankommen. Ich vertrat mir die Beine auf dem Fußweg um den alten Aussichtsturm (Anm. d. Übers.: Gibt´s da so was? War noch nie da. Wüßte nicht, was die Textstelle sonst bedeuten könnte), um die spektakuläre Aussicht auf pittoreske kleine Städtchen unten in der Ebene rund um den Berg zu genießen, bevor ich mich aufmachte zu dem Parkplatz, den wir als Treffpunkt vereinbart hatten.

Natürlich waren auf dem Feldberg mehr BMWs als Harleys, aber damit muß man in der Heimat der ehrwürdigen Bajuwarischen Motorenschmiede wohl auch rechnen. Alles im allem waren wohl zwischen 50 und 100 Motorräder aller nur denkbaren Art und Marke. Die Fahrer gaben sich alle Mühe, cool und desinteressiert zu wirken und posierten in ihren Textil- und Lederklamotten. Bevor ich auf die Fahrer zu sprechen komme, ein Wort zu den deutschen Bikern: Sie wissen, wie man sich anzieht.

Sogar die Rollerfahrer ? und es war bestimmt ein Dutzend von ihnen da mit ihren kleinen Hondas, Suzukis und sogar der einen oder anderen Vespa- trugen von Kopf bis Fuß die richtigen Klamotten. Das Wetter in Deutschland ist bestenfalls unvorhersehbar, und die Fahrer wissen, was wie ein sonniger, 20° warmer Tag beginnt, kann in Kälte, Regen oder sogar Schnee enden- und das ohne Vorwarnung.Die gesamte Oberbekleidung ist abriebfest und Regendicht. Gut sichtbare, reflektierende Applikationen auf den Rücken der Jacken und auf den Helmen wo immer ich hinschaute.

Die deutschen Maschinen waren genauso beeindruckend wie die auf einem der Bikertreffen in den guten alten USA, abgesehen davon, daß es hier anscheinend auch nicht das kleinste Bisschen an Vorurteilen zwischen den verschiedenen Bikertypen zu geben scheint. Da parkte die BMW K-Serie neben einer klassischen Moto Guzzi, diese wiederum neben einem Harley-ähnlich gestylten Reis-Chopper. Jeder betrachtete den anderen als Bruder im Geiste, als Anhänger der gleichen Sportart. Nur die Hooligan-Typen auf ihren Rennrepliken sonderten sich ab, aber ich vermute, um Platz für die Burn-outs zu haben oder um einen guten Startplatz für die Rennen bergabwärts zu ergattern.

Uwe, Norbert und Rolf kamen an, als ich gerade all die Motorräder besichtigte. Ich konnte den typischen Turbinensound der GSX 1100 G schon erkennen, bevor ich die Maschinen auf dem Parkplatz ankommen sah. Nach kurzer Vorstellung unterhielten wir uns über unsere Bikes, und ich konnte einen genaueren Eindruck von den Unterschieden zwischen dem amerikanischen und dem europäischen Modell gewinnen. Was mich am meisten überraschte, waren die Bedienungseinrichtungen. Man stelle sich vor: Eurobiker können ihre Scheinwerfer ausschalten...

Bei einem Kaffee unterhielten wir vier uns über Motorräder, Motorradfahren, erzählten uns die Geschichten unserer Anfänge als Biker, und welchen Fahrstil wir mögen. Anscheinend benutzt diese Gruppe deutscher Fahrer ihre Maschinen als Hauptbeförderungsmittel. Das überraschte mich ein wenig, denn Motorradfahren ist in der Europäischen Union sehr viel teurer als in den Staaten.

Steuern, Abgaben und Vorschriften machen das Hobby Motorradfahren in Deutschland sehr teuer. Obwohl Motorräder eigentlich Sinn machen in dem Teil der Welt, in dem das Benzin über vier Dollar pro Gallone kostet, die strengen technischen Überprüfungen alle zwei Jahre würden dem amerikanischen Gelegenheitsbiker wohl den Rest geben. Die deutschen Gesetze verlangen vom Fahrer, jedes Extrateil, das nicht zur Serienausstattung gehört, in die Papiere eintragen zu lassen. Zubehörteile müssen von der Verkehrsbehörde geprüft und freigegeben werden und sind daher ziemlich teuer. Die Auspuffgase werden gemessen und reguliert, und der Anbau eines nicht zugelassenen Endtopfes kann sogar dazu führen, dass die Maschine beschlagnahmt wird.

Nachdem ich mich drei Stunden lang mit Uwe, Norbert und Rolf unterhalten hatte, war ich hin- und hergerissen zwischen Dankbarkeit für die Freiheiten, die ich als amerikanischer Biker genießen darf, und dem Sehnen nach Hilfe, die die Eurobiker dafür bekommen, daß sie sich den strengen Regelungen in ihrem Teil der Welt unterwerfen. (Anm. d. Übers.: Keine Ahnung, was das heißen soll...)

Die Highways (in Deutschland) sind wesentlich motorradfreundlicher als in den Staaten. Die Schilder stehen weiter weg von der Fahrbahn und stellen nicht so eine große Gefahr dar für einen rutschenden Biker. Die Leitplanken sind so gestaltet, daß ein Unglücksfahrer nicht darunter hindurchrutschen kann. Die Geschwindigkeiten auf der Autobahn sind wesentlich höher und werden nicht so streng überwacht wie in den Staaten, aber die Fahrer sind so erzogen, dass sie NIEMALS rechts rüberfahren, um schnellere Fahrzeuge passieren zu lassen. Von den meisten Verkehrsteilnehmern wird den Motorradfahrern großer Respekt entgegengebracht.

Auch das europäische Autodesign hilft der Sicherheit der Biker. Die Autos sind wegen der hohen Spritkosten viel kleiner als diejenigen, die man in den Staaten sieht, so daß Motorradfahrer wesentlich früher zu erkennen sind. Es sind auch nur sehr wenige hohe Geländewagen (Anm. d. Übers.: SUV = Sport Utility vehicle, eigentlich Mix aus Geländewagen und Van) unterwegs auf deutschen Straßen. Die Autos und LKW haben Blinker vorne und hinten, wie in den USA, aber zusätzlich auch noch an den Seiten, damit ein Vorbeifahrender sehen kann, was der jeweils andere vor hat. Große LKW müssen vorne und hinten große Stoßstangen haben, zusätzlich dazu auch noch Zaunähnliche Abweiser an den Seiten, damit verunglückte Fahrer nicht unter die gefährliche Tandemachse geraten können.

Hebt das die Nachteile auf? Ich weiß es nicht. Uwe erzählte mir, daß Motorradfahrer in den Städten immer noch nicht ernstgenommen werden. Obwohl Motorräder 10% der Zulassungsstatistik ausmachen (in den USA nur 3%) gibt es eine überproportional hohe Beteiligung von Bikern, die in Unfälle verwickelt werden. Wie in Amerika sind die Folgen und Verletzungen bei verunglückten Bikern größer als bei anderen Kraftfahrern.

Im Verlaufe unsres Treffens fielen mir viele Gemeinsamkeiten angenehm auf, die alle Kradler teilen- egal wo auf der Welt wir fahren. Meine deutschen Freunde verstanden sehr gut, was mich als Sicherheitsinstruktor beschäftigt. Ich konnte mich sehr gut in Ihre Ansicht über das fahren in Europa hineinfühlen. Letztendlich sind wir alle eine große Familie.

Unsere Liebe zu Motorrädern, die uns vom Rest der Welt unterscheidet, brachte uns zusammen, überbrückte sprachliche und kulturelle Barrieren. Wir schüttelten uns die Hände in ehrlicher Zuneigung, und wünschten uns gegenseitig wärmstens das Allerbeste. Ich sah meinen deutschen Freunden nach, wie sie vom Parkplatz ritten- auf Maschinen fast genau wie meiner eigenen, und ein Teil von mir ging mit ihnen, auf den Ritt die dunkle, geschwungene Asphaltpiste den Feldberg hinunter, durch die Wälder und noch viel weiter.

Schlussbemerkung des Übersetzers:

Ich habe diesen Text (teilweise etwas holprig) aus dem Stegreif übersetzt, ohne mich in allen Punkten sklavisch an das Original halten zu können- einfach weil ich im Büro sitze und nicht die Zeit hatte, mich noch genauer mit ihm beschäftigen zu können. Ich habe mich trotzdem bemüht, den Ton und die Stimmung des Schreibers möglichst Originalgetreu wiederzugeben. Ich habe ihn aber auch nicht mehr Korrekturgelesen- wer Fehler findet, darf sie behalten.
Im Gegenzug nehme ich mir das recht, auch weiterhin auf diesen Seiten mitzulesen, auch wenn ich (noch) keine "G" mein eigen nenne... ;o))

Übersetzung: Frank

_________________
cu UweBild Bild


Nach oben
 Profil E-Mail senden  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags:
BeitragVerfasst: Mo Jan 29, 2007 20:31 
Offline
Ferryfix & iron butt
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: Do Jul 13, 2006 20:52
Beiträge: 1875
Wohnort:Spennymoor, England
Alter: 63
Persönliches Album
Fraro hat geschrieben:
Interessant wäre es, mal zu hören, ob Closey ähnliche Erfahrungen gemacht hat...


Frank, ich habe sehr ähnliche Erfahrungen gehabt. Leider ich bin nicht gewandt mit Wörter, English oder Deutsch. :(

I have not read Davids report before, here or on the old G-site, but i have enjoyed it very much. Thanks Rolf :-D

Closey


Nach oben
 Profil E-Mail senden  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags:
BeitragVerfasst: Mo Jan 29, 2007 21:46 
Offline
Forenlämmchen & Frauenversteher
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: Do Jul 13, 2006 21:01
Beiträge: 4926
Wohnort:OHZ (Garlstedt)
Alter: 48
Persönliches Album
@ Closey: It would be very interesting to learn, how YOU see the german roads/bikers/car drivers. For excample, I was quite surprised that Dave found the germans roads so "fast". We don't notice the specialities of "our way" of course, as we grew up with it.

Hopefully in summer I can write about my experience with the english roads and traffic...

_________________
Ein Frosch ohne Humor ist nur ein kleiner grüner Haufen!
(Kermit, 1976)


Nach oben
 Profil E-Mail senden  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags:
BeitragVerfasst: So Feb 04, 2007 20:42 
Offline
Ferryfix & iron butt
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: Do Jul 13, 2006 20:52
Beiträge: 1875
Wohnort:Spennymoor, England
Alter: 63
Persönliches Album
Frank i find the German roads easy to ride and certainly not to fast for me, although i am very watchful on the Autobahn as i am not used to cars overtaking me on the motorways in England.

I do find the towns a bit of a problem in Germany as the road signs are quite small, i had a particular problem in Uelzen on the way to Wittfeitzen last year, but having said that i do not like riding through strange towns and cities in the UK neither.
As long as i remind myself (especially in the morning) LINKS FAHREN i dont have problems riding on the "wrong" side of the road.
I look forward to hearing what you think about riding on the "proper" side of the road here in sunny England. :wink:

I find the German bikers much the same as English bikers, friendly courteous and helpful. Yes sometimes the language barrier can be a problem in communicating but i usually find that a few beers and a convivial party helps to cross this barrier. Certainly Julie and i have always felt welcomed and very much at ease in the company of the G_Gemeinde.

I Hope this explains a little why we so enjoy our trips to Germany.

Regards,

Closey


Nach oben
 Profil E-Mail senden  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags:
BeitragVerfasst: So Feb 04, 2007 20:58 
Offline
Gepäckfix
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: Do Jul 13, 2006 21:05
Beiträge: 5777
Wohnort:Nürnberg
Persönliches Album
closey hat geschrieben:
As long as i remind myself (especially in the morning) LINKS FAHREN i dont have problems riding on the "wrong" side of the road.


Hi Closey,
if you do so across sony England, everything will be fine!
And, please, don't think/do so this way visting old europe. :]

Cheers - Rolf

_________________
Bild

Fürth zählt in Franken nicht, steht sogar bei Wikipedia:
Fürth in Bayern
*flöt*


Nach oben
 Profil E-Mail senden  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags:
BeitragVerfasst: Mo Feb 05, 2007 06:38 
Offline
Slowly Bertie

Registriert: Fr Jul 14, 2006 18:49
Beiträge: 3792
Persönliches Album
@ closey

Zitat:
sometimes the language barrier can be a problem


Thats the matter for me. :oops:

I want to speak more to you,but my english is not so traineed as Frank for example.

My last spoken words in english was at the time that we meet us the first time.The Time befor this date is was since 1997 in Domenican Republik that i spoke english. :shocked:
To read and listen is such more easyer for me than to speak.

Zitat:
always felt welcomed and very much at ease in the company of the G_Gemeinde


We are Family :gr: :gr: :gr:

_________________
Spruch des Monats:
Nichts ist so beständig wie die Veränderung.


Nach oben
 Profil  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags:
BeitragVerfasst: Mo Feb 05, 2007 18:38 
Offline
Ferryfix & iron butt
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: Do Jul 13, 2006 20:52
Beiträge: 1875
Wohnort:Spennymoor, England
Alter: 63
Persönliches Album
Rolf hat geschrieben:
closey hat geschrieben:
As long as i remind myself (especially in the morning) LINKS FAHREN i dont have problems riding on the "wrong" side of the road.


Hi Closey,
if you do so across sony England, everything will be fine!
And, please, don't think/do so this way visting old europe. :]

Cheers - Rolf


OOOPS :oops: Rolf, I of course meant to say RECHTS FAHREN Gestern abend habe ich zu viele Bier.

Closey :wink:


Nach oben
 Profil E-Mail senden  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags:
BeitragVerfasst: Mo Feb 05, 2007 18:57 
Offline
Ferryfix & iron butt
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: Do Jul 13, 2006 20:52
Beiträge: 1875
Wohnort:Spennymoor, England
Alter: 63
Persönliches Album
Speedy hat geschrieben:
@ closey

Zitat:
sometimes the language barrier can be a problem


Thats the matter for me. :oops:

I want to speak more to you,but my english is not so traineed as Frank for example.

My last spoken words in english was at the time that we meet us the first time.The Time befor this date is was since 1997 in Domenican Republik that i spoke english. :shocked:
To read and listen is such more easyer for me than to speak.

Zitat:
always felt welcomed and very much at ease in the company of the G_Gemeinde


We are Family :gr: :gr: :gr:


Speedy i can read German sort of ok but listening is a problem as i am slightly deaf. Julie is better at listening than reading, she also remembers the word order you use better than me.
Our lessons continue as we would both like to become better speakers.

We are family
CloseyBild


Nach oben
 Profil E-Mail senden  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags:
BeitragVerfasst: Mo Feb 05, 2007 20:29 
Offline
Majestix
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: Do Jul 13, 2006 20:46
Beiträge: 6210
Wohnort:Fernwald
Alter: 58
Persönliches Album
closey hat geschrieben:
slightly deaf.


In the wake of shooting?

closey hat geschrieben:
We are family


That's it. :wink:

_________________
cu UweBild Bild


Nach oben
 Profil E-Mail senden  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags:
BeitragVerfasst: Mo Feb 05, 2007 21:30 
Offline
Ferryfix & iron butt
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: Do Jul 13, 2006 20:52
Beiträge: 1875
Wohnort:Spennymoor, England
Alter: 63
Persönliches Album
Yes i think shooting and motorbiking for 35 years have taken there toll on my ears Uwe. :(

Closey


Nach oben
 Profil E-Mail senden  
 
Beiträge der letzten Zeit anzeigen:  Sortiere nach  
Ein neues Thema erstellen Auf das Thema antworten  [ 14 Beiträge ] 

Alle Zeiten sind UTC + 1 Stunde [ Sommerzeit ]


Wer ist online?

Mitglieder in diesem Forum: 0 Mitglieder und 1 Gast


Du darfst keine neuen Themen in diesem Forum erstellen.
Du darfst keine Antworten zu Themen in diesem Forum erstellen.
Du darfst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht ändern.
Du darfst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht löschen.
Du darfst keine Dateianhänge in diesem Forum erstellen.

Suche nach:
Gehe zu: